Coker Cemetery Association, San Antonio, Texas

click here to contact Coker Cemetery Association click here to contribute to Coker Cemetery click here for Coker Cemetery obituaries click here for burials in Coker Cemetery click here for helpful links click here to view images of Coker kin click here to read Coker Cemetery history click here for Coker Cemetery charter and bylaws click here to learn about Coker Cemetery click here to return to Coker Cemetery home page HISTORY

Coker Cemetery History #15


by Bob Battaglia


The Coker Community looked a lot different around 1900. The picture below shows the home of Amos Dickens Jones about 1898/99 based on estimated age of the children. Since this photo is on plain paper and run thru the printer, it will not be clear as desired. But it gives a nice feel for the surroundings in those days. Amosís home pictured here was east of the Coker Church in the land adjoining and set back further from Coker Loop. My understanding is that the home burned down later on. If anyone knows who Charles Perkins was, I would appreciate hearing from them. My guess is he was working for Amos.

Gerald Jones, descendant of Samuel C. Jones and Ransom Capps, has been doing some research on his ancestors. He found the following data at the Texas Ranger Library and has requested permission to place Texas Ranger markers on the graves of Samuel C. Jones and Ransom Capps at the Coker Cemetery. Upon approval of the Coker Cemetery trustees, a date will be set to place these markers.


L-R: Charles Perkins, Ed M. Jones Sr, Belle Capps Jones (wife of Charles Edw Jones), their children,
Eldred and Marie and Amos Dickens Jones.


The Coker Community looked a lot different around 1900. This picture shows the home of Amos Dickens Jones about 1898/99 based on estimated age of the children. Since this photo is on plain paper and run thru the printer, it will not be clear as desired. But it gives a nice feel for the surroundings in those days. Amosís home pictured here was east of the Coker Church in the land adjoining and set back further from Coker Loop. My understanding is that the home burned down later on. If anyone knows who Charles Perkins was, I would appreciate hearing from them. My guess is he was working for Amos.

Gerald Jones, descendant of Samuel C. Jones and Ransom Capps, has been doing some research on his ancestors. He found the following data at the Texas Ranger Library and has requested permission to place Texas Ranger markers on the graves of Samuel C. Jones and Ransom Capps at the Coker Cemetery. Upon approval of the Coker Cemetery trustees, a date will be set to place these markers.

Gerald Jones offers the following information on his ancestors. Samuel C. Jones has been awarded a TX Ranger cross by the Former Texas Ranger Association. He was born in TN in 1793 and married in Whitley KY in 1821. He arrived in TX about 1840 and in Bexar County by 1846. He served in the Mexican War in April 1847-April 1848. (A record of his pension application #WC-6787 is on file with the US Veterans Administration.) Later he served in the TX Rangers in 1859, although already aged 66. His service in the TX Rangers was as a private under William Tobin in the Mounted Volunteers.

Later Samuel, his wife and small child moved from the Salado area to a remote ranch in Medina County, where the three of them withstood an Indian attack of several days. Samuel did the shooting, his wife Jane molded the bullets, and a young daughter, when it was safe, was sent to fetch cow chips for fuel to melt the lead. Samuel Jones died in 1889 at age 96 and was buried in Coker Cemetery.

Ransom Capps, son-in-law of Samuel C. Jones has also been awarded a TX Ranger cross. He served in Ford's Company Texas Rangers. He received an Indian Wars Pension # SA-8348.Ransom Capps was born in 1830 in TN. He arrived in Bexar County in 1851 and married Eliza Jane Jones, daughter of Samuel C. He died in 1921 at almost ninety-two and was buried in Coker. In his obituary in the San Antonio Express he was described "as among the last of the living pioneers of Texas whose deeds have been immortalized in history and song."

click here for a PDF of this article

click here to return to the top of this article